PARENTS

WELCOME BAND PARENTS

Being a band member is a rewarding experience providing life-long memories for students. There are many ways that, as a band parent, you can become part of the experience too!

First and foremost, support your band student as he/she is going to learn many important life lessons through participation in the band. Make sure you understand how the band operates and the importance of your child’s role within the band. If your student is interested, enroll him/her in private lessons to enhance his/her educational experience.

Lastly, feel free to reach out to our New Member Liaison with any questions you may have!

FUNDRAISING

Operation of our organization costs a lot of money. For the most part we are self-sustaining and raise the money ourselves. In addition to our student-account fundraisers, which directly subsidize your own personal band-related expenses, we have general band fundraisers.

While some families may choose to pay out of pocket rather than participating in the student account fundraisers, it is requested that every band family participate in the general band fundraisers.

These fundraisers cover expenses including new instrument purchase, instrument maintenance, classroom supplies, sheet music, guest artists and clinicians, financial aid, and clerical expenses, to name a few.

REDUCE YOUR FAIR SHARE

In extracurricular ensembles, there is a financial commitment required as well as a participation commitment. Each member is to earn and/or pay his or her “fair share.” It is the expectation of this organization that all members will complete their financial obligation to the band in a timely manner.

Student Fair Share pays for travel (transportation, lodging, meals), show design, instruction/staff, uniform/costume maintenance, props, equipment, truck rental/maintenance, and field maintenance.Each family has the opportunity to subsidize fair share with student account fundraising. Any amount raised from these opportunities will go directly towards the student’s account and applied toward the next fair share payment.

VOLUNTEER

Our program can’t run without the help of many volunteers. From chaperoning at practices, football games, and competitions to loading & transporting props and equipment, your time can be put to use.

As a parent of a teenager, you know how they love to eat! Keep your teen and 175 of his/her best friends hydrated and fueled by donating snacks and drinks.

There are also many service opportunities from uniform/costume maintenance, prop building, organization, rendering minor first aid, etc.

The saying holds true: It takes a village!

I am so thankful [my daughter] has found such a supportive group of kids who share the same passion... we are ecstatic she can be a part of something special and bigger than any individual.

– Justin, Band Parent

HOW TO BE A BAND PARENT

COMMUNICATION

Communication is the key to the operation of a large organization. Carefully review the Weekly Band Broadcast email as it contains important information including dates and times of upcoming events.

SCHEDULING

Please help your student fulfill his/her commitment to marching band by planning your family’s schedule around rehearsals and performances as much as possible. This includes doctor’s appointments, family vacations, etc.

NUTRITION

Make certain your student is taking care of his/her body and fueling properly, particularly during Marching Band Camp. Greasy or salty foods should be avoided, as should soda. Hydrate with water often.

SLEEP

Encourage your student to get plenty of rest. Marching Band, specifically Band Camp, requires a lot of physical activity. Rest ensures your student’s body can keep up with the demand.

TIME MANAGEMENT

One of the most important things that marching band teaches young men and women is time management. Have frequent conversations with your student about balancing academics and extracurricular activities so they can be successful and fully committed to both. Remind them about the dangers of procrastination. If academics suffer, the student’s transcript can see long-lasting effects. If a student’s marching band commitment suffers because his/her schoolwork starts suffering, we are all affected.

DIRECTION

During a competition or event, the students are under the direction of the director, staff, and chaperones. Parents are asked not to enter student rooms, join in band meetings and meals, participate in the execution of the event, or pull their student aside or away from the band at any time. This is for safety and liability reasons and well as to ensure that the students are able to focus on their responsibilities to the band.

REHEARSALS

We have a “closed rehearsal” policy. This means that only designated band chaperones will be allowed to watch rehearsals. This is not only for the students’ safety also to allow them to perform to their highest potential without distractions.

Please do not attempt to correct or instruct a student on music, choreography, drill, movement, technique, etc. It is the instructors’ job to make instructional decisions and corrections.

TEAM DISCIPLINE

Perhaps the most important thing that marching band teaches is discipline. We strive to maintain a professional and disciplined appearance, both on and off the field. When with the band, students lose their individuality and become a team. All decisions they make should be guided by this principle.

AUDIENCE

Be a supportive audience member and attend as many performances as possible. Wear your GH SpiritWear so our presence is known. Avoid making negative or judgmental comments about another school or group or their performance. Applaud and cheer for our band – the effect on the audience and/or judges can be enhanced by the crowd’s response.

WINNING

Our goal is for each member to continue to improve from performance to performance and for the program to achieve certain short-term and long-term goals as determined by the staff. Winning is not the primary goals of the Green Hope Band.

As parents, we should celebrate a great performance, whether we beat another group or not. Contrarily, if our performance wasn’t to our standard, we will reflect on what we can do to improve for future performances.